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Practice Description: Take Charge

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Using the Take Charge Curriculum to Teach Self-Determination Skills, Educational Planning Knowledge and Engagement, and Persistence in School

What is the evidence base?

This is an evidence-based practice for students with disabilities based on two methodologically sound group design studies with random assignment studies with 184 total participants with and without disabilities. This is an evidence-based practice for students with other health impairment (OHI) based on two methodologically sound group design studies with random assignment with 69 participants with OHI. This is an evidence-based practice for students with emotional/behavioral disorders (E/BD) based on two methodologically sound group design studies with random assignment with 77 participants with E/BD.

Where is the best place to find out how to do this practice?

With whom was it implemented?

 Students with

    • Intellectual Disability (n = 16)
    • Other health impairment (n = 69)
    • Specific learning disabilities (n = 49)
    • Emotional/behavioral disorders (n = 77)
    • Speech-language (n = 28)
    • Physical (including deafness and blindness; n=3)
  • Average reported age was 15.49 (Geenen et al., 2013) and 16.8 (Powers et al., 2012)
  • Males (n = 102), females (n = 82)
  • Ethnicity
  • Caucasian (n = 92)
  • African American (n = 46)
  • Latino/Hispanic (n = 13)
  • Native American (n = 15)
  • Asian American (n = 1)
  • Multiracial (n = 14)
  • Other (n = 3)

What is the practice?

The Take Charge Curriculum has been defined as an integrated self-determination promotion approach that includes student coaching, mentorship, peer support, and parent support (Powers et al., 1998).

In the studies used to establish the evidence base for using  Take Charge Curriculum to teach self-determination skills including:

  • Achieving goals (Powers et al., 2012; Geenen et al., 2013)
  • Participating in group mentoring workshops (Powers et al., 2012; Geenen et al., 2013)

Where has it been implemented?

 During unscheduled school class periods, before school, after school (n = 2)

 How does this practice relate to Common Core Standards?

 ELA-LITERACY.SL.11-12.1

  • Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grades 11-12 topics, texts, and issues, building on others' ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.
    • ELA-LITERACY.SL.11-12.1.B
      Work with peers to promote civil, democratic discussions and decision-making, set clear goals and deadlines, and establish individual roles as needed.
    • ELA-LITERACY.SL.11-12.1.C
      Propel conversations by posing and responding to questions that probe reasoning and evidence; ensure a hearing for a full range of positions on a topic or issue; clarify, verify, or challenge ideas and conclusions; and promote divergent and creative perspectives.CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.SL.11-12.1.D
      Respond thoughtfully to diverse perspectives; synthesize comments, claims, and evidence made on all sides of an issue; resolve contradictions when possible; and determine what additional information or research is required to deepen the investigation or complete the task.

How does this practice relate to the Common Career Technical Core?

  • 02 Demonstrate language arts knowledge and skills required to pursue the full range of post-secondary education and career opportunities.
    • 02.01 Model behaviors that demonstrate active listening.
    • 02.02 Adapt language for audience, purpose, situation. (i.e. diction/structure, style).
    • 02.03 Organize oral and written information.

 References used to establish this evidence base:

Powers, L. E., Geenen, S., Powers, J., Pommier-Satya, S., Turner, A., Dalton, L. D., Drummond, D., Swank, P., & Research Consortium to Increase the Success of Youth in Foster Care (2012). My Life: Effects of a longitudinal, randomized study of self-determination enhancement on the transition outcomes of youth in foster care and special education. Children and Youth Services Review34, 2179-2187.

Geenen, S., Powers, L. E., Powers, J., Cunningham, M., McMahon, L., Nelson, M., Dalton, L. D., Swank, P., Fullerton, A. & Research Consortium to Increase the Success of Youth in Foster Care. (2013). Experimental study of a self-determination intervention for youth in foster care. Career Development and Transition for Exceptional Individuals36, 84-95.

Download the Take Charge Practice Description (PDF)

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