Effective Practices 

NTACT:C is charged with assisting stakeholders to implement evidence-based and promising practices to promote positive outcomes for all students with disabilities.

Throughout the website and other resources from NTACT:C, effective practices and predictors have been evaluated regarding the amount, type, and quality of the research conducted, and are labeled as either (a) evidence-based, (b) research-based, or (c) promising. These designations indicate the confidence one can have in the likely effectiveness of the intervention, when implemented as defined and recommended.

NTACT:C recognizes that there are also practices in the field for which there is not yet evidence of effectiveness. We will continue to support practitioners to implement practices, using the best available evidence.

Please see the definitions and criteria for the current evidence. Additionally, if you have questions about our living systematic review of the literature in the fields of , career and technical education, secondary special education and transition including school completion, and vocational rehabilitation, please contact Dr. Valerie Mazzotti vlmazzot@uncc.edu Dr. Dawn Rowe  roweda@etsu.edu

NTACT:C will update the work of the National Technical Assistance Center on Transition with Practice Descriptions and Lesson Plan Starters to support education and vocational rehabilitation practitioners. The results of the living systematic review will continue to expand on this body of resources for the field.

Practice Descriptions and Lesson Plans are being reviewed and updated, and will be coming soon. If you need these resources, please contact ntact-collab@uncc.edu.

Research Types

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Evidence-Based Practices

  • demonstrates a strong record of success for improving outcomes
  • uses rigorous research designs
  • adheres to indicators of quality research
More Evidence-Based Practices
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Research-Based Practices

  • demonstrates a sufficient record of success for improving outcomes
  • uses rigorous research designs
  • may adhere to indicators of quality research
More Research-Based Practices
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Promising Practices

  • demonstrates some success for improving outcomes
  • may use rigorous research designs
  • may adhere to indicators of quality research
More Promising Practices